Articles - West Coast Nut

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Almond Disease and Control

By Julie R. Johnson, Contributing Writer

From planting to maturity and crop production, almonds trees can be host to a plethora of diseases, be it bacterial, fungal, viral, parasitic or phytoplasmal. These diseases and how to control them was the topic of Dr. Jim Adaskaveg's presentation during this year's North Valley Nut Conference hosted by West Coast Nut in conjunction with the UCCE Butte/Glenn Counties Almond and Walnut Day at Silver Dollar Fairgrounds in Chico. Adaskaveg, professor and plant pathologist with the Department of Plant Pathology, UC Riverside, who specializes in foliar disease of almonds and other tree crops, shared the springtime diseases of almond that...

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Blight Control in Walnuts

By Julie R. Johnson, Contributing Writer

Blight's description “as any cause of impairment, destruction or ruin,” definitely applies to Xanthomonas arboricola pv juglandis (Xaj), a pathogen of Walnut Blight and the topic of Richard Buchner's presentation during this year's annual Walnut Trade Show hosted by West Coast Nut. Buchner, UCCE Orchards Advisor, Tehama County, said walnut blight caused by Xaj can cause significant crop loss and determining an orchard's risk is often a matter of guess work. “Three things are necessary for the disease to occur,” he explained, “pathogen, host and favorable weather. This is often referred to as the disease triangle.” One of Buchner’s “take...

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Approaches to Spider Mite Management in Almonds

By Emily J. Symmes, IPM Advisor UCCE and Statewide IPM Program

Spider mites are considered indirect pests in almonds, in the sense that they do not feed directly on the harvested product. Rather, they cause injury to plants by sucking cell contents from foliage. Signs of feeding injury include leaf stippling, yellowing, and dropped leaves. High populations of mites can also be recognized by webbing on leaves and tree terminals (Image 1). Significant spider mite injury can become economic crop damage in almonds in subsequent seasons in the form of reduced vegetative tree growth and crop reduction. In addition, excessive leaf drop can interfere with harvest operations and nut drying in...

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Walnut & Almond Pest Management: Preparing for a Successful New Year

By Emily J. Symmes, IPM Advisor UCCE and Statewide IPM Program

With the wild ride of the 2017 growing season now behind us, January is a good time for orchardists to take stock of the key issues of the previous year and begin outlining their production and pest management activities for the upcoming season. During the dormant period, one of the most critical activities that can be done is to sit down with your orchard manager, pest/crop adviser, and your record books to review your pest management history and devise a plan-of-attack for the coming season. Heading into the season armed with lessons learned from successes and failures of previous years,...

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Managing Spider Mites in Almonds and Walnuts

By Emily J. Symmes, IPM Advisor UCCE and Statewide IPM Program

Spider mites are considered indirect pests in almonds and walnuts, in the sense that they do not feed directly on the harvested product. Rather, they cause injury to plants by sucking cell contents from foliage. Signs of feeding injury include leaf stippling, yellowing, and dropped leaves. High populations of mites can also be recognized by webbing on leaves and tree terminals. Significant spider mite injury can become economic crop damage in almonds in subsequent seasons in the form of reduced vegetative tree growth and crop reduction. In walnuts, early season defoliation can reduce nut yield and quality that year. In...

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The Battle Against NOW and Coddling Moth

By Julie R. Johnson, Contributing Writer

How to the fight the battle against Navel orangewood (NOW) and coddling moth in walnuts was the take home message of Emily Symmes, UCCE Area IPM Advisor, Sacramento Valley, in her presentation at the West Coast Nut hosted Annual Walnut Trade Show at the Yuba-Sutter Fairgrounds on Jan. 6, 2017. “Coddling moth hit pretty hard this last harvest, as did Navel orangeworm,” she said. “A lot of people were caught a little off guard by both.” Of particular concern was damage seen in the later maturing varieties, which have historically been considered less vulnerable to worm damage. “Earlier-than-typical, and spread...

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