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Pistachios



LFB in Control for Almonds and Pistachios


When you see adult leaffooted bugs (LFB) in your almond or pistachio orchards, it is time to take action. There is no established threshold for economic damage caused by this piercing-sucking pest, said Kris Tollerup, UC Cooperative Extension area Integrated Pest Management advisor. Traps and lures for LFB are still being evaluated. Visual observation of LFB in an orchard should prompt treatment, advisors said. LFB This large insect pest is a native of California, and has been found in the San Joaquin Valley from Butte to Kern counties. While LFB may be found in most valley locations, there are specific environmental conditions that allow for populations to build. Those conditions include riparian areas, protected overwintering sites and host plants. Almond and pistachio orchards adjacent to those sites can become infested and are vulnerable to crop loss or damage from LFB. Tollerup said he has seen a 50 percent almond crop...

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Pistachio Prices Hinge on Export Expectations


Off and on. That rhythm is the cadence for pistachio yields. On and on is what exports need to be. Last year two-thirds of U.S. pistachios crossed borders or sailed oceans. California producers have planted pistachio trees at a faster rate than any other tree nut variety over the last decade. Watching production grow, the RaboResearch team developed a supply-and-demand analytical tool to help growers anticipate prices levels for the next five years. Supply Growth is Set to Continue Pistachio bearing acreage grew more than twofold over the last decade, making pistachios California’s fastest-growing tree nut in terms of acreage. From 2024, bearing area will sit at about 370,000 acres—roughly a 40 percent increase (see Figure 1). Industry estimates show that average pistachio net returns per acre exceed those obtained in competing nuts, creating incentives for new plantings. A relevant proportion of pistachio’s planted acreage is located in the Southern...

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2019 ‘Off’ Year Pistachio Crop Looks Above Average


Adequate chill over the winter in all California growing regions, plus new acreage coming into production are expected to bring in a harvest that is estimated to be in the 700-850 million pound range. That is not close to record 994 million pounds of pistachios harvested last year in California, Arizona and New Mexico, but is very good production for this alternate bearing crop, said Richard Matoian, executive director of American Pistachio Growers. Increased Acreage Matoian said he is comfortable with the 700-850 million pound range that was forecast at the International Dried Fruit and Nut Congress in May. The favorable weather conditions played a part in the good size crop, but the additional pistachio acreage coming into production continues to boost crop size. The pistachio industry last year reported 260,000 acres of pistachio trees in production. This year, 288,000 acres will contribute to the harvest. The 2020 pistachio crop...

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Golden Hills Nut Cluster

Getting the Most Out of a Golden Hills Pistachio Harvest


Prior to the release of the cultivar Golden Hills, pistachio growers in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) of California were accustomed to harvesting a single female cultivar named Kerman. Since Kerman was the only female cultivar that most growers had any experience with, the way Kerman was harvested became synonymous with how pistachios, in general, should be harvested. However, different cultivars have “individualities” that should be addressed to make a harvest more successful. What makes for a successful Kerman harvest is not, necessarily, that which makes for a successful Golden Hills harvest and vice versa. Although Golden Hills was released from the University of California breeding program to the pistachio industry in 2005, acreage did not begin to increase appreciably until 2012, when approximately 3000 aces were planted. Assuming all goes well in orchard establishment, pistachio require approximately five or six years to produce a crop worth harvesting. If we...

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Supplemental Pollination Shows Potential


Every year in early February, University of California Cooperative Extension (UCCE) farm advisor Elizabeth Fichtner said, she gets calls from anxious almond growers about using supplemental pollination in their orchards to ensure profitable yields. Challenging Weather Growers have concerns about almond pollination, she said, when the extended weather forecasts call for cool, cloudy and rainy days. Their bee supplier may not be able to deliver adequate numbers of hives or hive strength may be an issue when there are fewer hours that bees will fly. This year was one of those challenging times of cool, wet weather that is not conducive to bee activity when flowers are blooming. The past winter may have been one of those times to consider supplemental pollination, but at Almond Day in June, Ficthner explained the mechanics of pollination as a process rather than a one-time event. Pollination Almond pollination is unique among prunus species...

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