Articles - West Coast Nut





Distribution Uniformity: Why it Matters, What Influences it, and Improving Yours

By Dani Lightle, UC Cooperative Extension Orchard Systems Advisor, Glenn, Butte & Tehama Counties

What is Distribution Uniformity?

Distribution Uniformity (DU) is a measure of how uniformly water is being applied across the orchard, or whether certain parts of the orchard are receiving more water than others. It is a measure of the irrigation system. DU is a different measure than irrigation efficiency, which is a measurement of how well the applied water matches the crop water requirements. Irrigation efficiency is a measurement of how well you—the irrigator—applies a correct amount of water at an appropriate frequency. However, it [caption id="attachment_1928" align="alignright" width="331"] Figure 1. Illustrations of irrigation...

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Solar Systems in Agriculture

The Future of Solar in Agriculture

By: Kathy Coatney, Editor

There are changes coming to solar in next few years. One of the big changes is the investment tax credit.  

Investment Tax Credit

The Investment Tax Credit is a 30 percent credit at the federal level that is available in all 50 states for any type of renewable energy. In California, this is the primary incentive available, according to Chad Cummings, director of sales and marketing for JKB Energy. What this means is, if it’s a million dollar project the grower receives an immediate tax discount of $300,000, which is different than a write off, Cummings explained. “This...

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A Few Arthropod Pests to Consider on Establishing Pistachio Trees

By Kris Tollerup, University of California Cooperative Extension Area-wide IPM Advisor, Kearny Agricultural Research and Extension Center, Parlier, California

The University of California (UC), Pest Management Guidelines provide recommendations for managing approximately 14 insect and mite pests on pistachio. A few of those pests, growers and pest control advisers (PCAs) should pay close attention to during the first few years while young trees establish. According to the National Agriculture Statistic Service, the industry in California has expanded by about 35 percent between 2010 and 2017 from roughly 215,000 to just over 329,000 acres. New plantings in that period ranged from 6,730 (2010) to 24,500 (2013), with acreage expanding by 18,000 in 2017. With so many acres of new pistachio...

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Update on Sterile Insect Program for Control of Navel Orangeworm

By Houston Wilson, Asst. Coop. Extension Specialist, Kearney Ag. Center, Dept. Entomology, UC Riverside
and Chuck Burks, Research Entomologist, USDA-ARS, San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Sciences Center

Sterile insect technique (SIT) makes use of large numbers of sterile insects which are released into wild populations as part of an area-wide integrated pest management (IPM) control strategy. Insects are typically mass-reared in a controlled environment and then ionizing radiation (e.g. x-rays, gamma rays) is used to induce genetic mutations that lead to sterility. The basic idea is that introduction of sterilized individuals into the wild population will limit the successful reproduction of wild individuals and lead to an overall reduction or even eradication of the target pest population (Knipling 1955). Mating with sterile individuals can reduce populations by...

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Economic Outlook for the 2019 Almond Pollination Season

By Brittney Goodrich, Assistant Professor, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology, Auburn University

Happy New Year! With every new year comes the realization that almond orchards will be in full bloom before long. This article summarizes some considerations for this year’s almond bloom, as well as what to expect in terms of colony supplies and pollination fees in the years to come.   The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) estimates that there were 1.1 million bearing almond acres in 2018. According to the USDA Cost of Pollination Survey, 1.5 million colonies were used in almond pollination in 2017, with an average 1.6 colonies/acre. This is down from the 2016 average of 1.7...

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Mating Disruption: A Crucial Tool for Nut Growers

By Kathy Coatney Editor

Mating disruption for navel orangeworm (NOW) has been widely tested throughout California with numerous research studies, and peer-reviewed research has demonstrated its efficacy. Mating disruption is a very simple process. Females emit pheromones, males use those pheromones to find the female. If an orchard is flooded with artificially produced pheromone the entire orchard smells like a female and the males struggle to find the real females. If they don’t find each other, they don’t mate, and if they don’t mate there are no eggs, no larvae, and less overall nut damage.   Mating Disruption in Almonds and Pistachios Navel orangeworm...

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