Articles - West Coast Nut

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Increasing Evidence of Pacific Flatheaded Borer Attack in Walnut Orchards in California

Background and Pest Status Flatheaded borer is a larval stage of one specialized group of beetles (Insect family-Buprestidae), which are glossy iridescent colors. The name ‘flatheaded’ comes from the enlarged and flattened shape just behind the head of the larval stage (Fig. 1) of the beetle (Fig. 2), and the flatheaded borer species that has become a major issue in walnuts is Pacific flatheaded borer (PFB), Chrysobothris mali, which is known to present in the western states such as Washington, Utah, Oregon, California. A similar type of borer species causing serious damage in various nurseries and other fruit and trees...

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Meet the New UCCE Farm Advisors

Joy Hollingsworth Kingsburg native Joy Hollingsworth is part of the 2019 crop of new University of California Cooperative Extension (UCCE) farm advisors. Hollingsworth was appointed in April as the nutrient management and soil quality advisor in Fresno, Kings, Madera and Tulare counties. “Right now I am focused on meeting growers and assessing their needs,” Hollingsworth said. “One area will be helping growers with new environmental regulations.” Hollingsworth said she is also planning directions for research. Most of her work so far has been in agronomic crops, but she said with the abundance of permanent crops in her area, she would...

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Grower Profile—Jocelyn Anderson

To Jocelyn Anderson, farming is a family tradition that has been passed down on both her mother and father’s side. Farming, however, wasn’t always where she envisioned her life taking her. Anderson’s maternal great grandparents moved to Anaheim from the Netherlands and started farming oranges. In search for more farmland her grandparents moved to Willows, California. They started a small farm, primarily farming sugar beets, row crops and rice. Jocelyn’s Dad, Gary, also grew up farming. His parents met at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo and farmed walnuts in Paso Robles. They sold the farm eventually to move up north...

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Women in Ag

From board rooms to hospitals to classrooms and even the farm, women are a growing segment to any business. More women are in leadership roles and executive positions in various different industries. It should be no surprise that agriculture is the same. According to the 2017 Census of Agriculture, more than 36 percent of farm operators are women, equally over 1.23 million nationwide. While the percentage of farms with women decision makers continues to grow, the number of male farmers fell by 1.7 percent to 2.17 million. Women are making an impact in the way businesses are run from the...

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The Latest in Drone Technology

Stressed trees and pest outbreaks in large orchards are not always easy to see with “on the ground inspections.” Time and cost for labor in checking orchards comes into play. There is also the possibility of an incorrect diagnosis. Identifying problem trees or areas and determining reason for tree stress can now be done with aerial drone technology. Aerial Drone Technology Chris Lawson, development manager for Aerobotics, a Cape Town based AgriTech startup, said aerial drone technology can assist growers and farm managers in identifying health or pest problem areas in large orchards. The company was co-founded by James Paterson...

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New Outlooks for Hull and Shell Management Options Using Biosolarization

Managing Almond Hulls and Shells Almonds are American’s favorite tree nuts by far1, but what many consumers do not realize is that the kernel we eat is only 27 percent of the nut. The majority of the almond nut—the hull and shell—is a byproduct. It is estimated that 1.6 billion pounds of shells and 4.5 billion pounds of hulls are co-produced with kernels annually, a number that is only expected to increase as more almond trees are planted in California2. Despite being inedible, hulls and shells are resources in their own right. The hull—similar to the flesh of other stone...

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